Category Archives: Bedroom Producer

Vocaloid for English Speakers – Easy and not too terribly expensive

My adventures in Vocaloid date back to 2012 when I first started getting into the music I heard on YouTube with Hatsuni Miku. At first I didn’t even realize it was a completely synthesized voice! After I figured out what was going on and what I was hearing, I really wanted to start using it. At that time it was still really hard to get any information on using Vocaloid in the West. I was struggling though Japanese websites and trying to understand all the concepts behind using it. Licensing was a huge pain as well because I had to get my editor from Yamaha, and the only English voice bank I could find at the time was from a company literally called “Internet”, haha.

Thankfully it’s much easier now. Yamaha put together a completely excellent voicebank called Cyber Diva. Not only is it English, it’s one of the nicest and most realistic sounding Vocaloids I’ve ever heard. I used it as the lead voice on my track “Atlantis Falls” (video below).

So how do you use it? Well Vocaloid isn’t just a plugin you plop into your VST folder. It’s a bit more complicated than that. You need a Vocaloid Editor and a Voicebank like Cyber Diva, or Miku to make vocaloid work. The two together will cost you about $200. It’s not super cheap, but considering what you can do with it, it’s not that expensive either.

Using the Vocaloid Editor is a bit weird. It is a stand alone program, so my general workflow is to make a rough mix of the song I want vocaloid on, then export that from whatever DAW I’m using at the time as a stereo wav file.

Then I open up the Vocaloid Editor and import the rough mix into the editor. There is where you compose the vocals. Vocaloid Editor has the ability to mix tracks and add fx as well, though I don’t really use it for that. Once I finish my Vocaloid tracks, I then export each one individually, and import them into my DAW where I composed the song. Then I do all of my mixing and fx on Vocaloid like it’s a regular vocal track.

Anyway, I hope this helps any English speakers who are a bit lost with Vocaloid and gives them an idea of how to get going with this amazing software!

Making a Linux Live MIDI Setup with SEQ24, Qsynth and Jack Rack

How to use a Linux laptop for live music performance with SEQ24 MIDI sequencer, Qsynth for soundfonts, and Jack-Rack for realtime fx manipulation.
Controllers used in this video:

Korg NanoKey2

MidiPlus Classic 49

This setup allows you to trigger loop based midi sequences on the fly, map MIDI controls to fx parameters, as well as play along in realtime all from a midi controller. This is not a fully in depth tutorial, but more of an overview of the full workspace. If you have any specific topics touched upon in the video that you’d like me to go further in depth about, just let me know in the comments section. This tutorial is a bit on the advanced side and assumes a general knowledge of Linux audio and Jack.

Soonhua Condenser Microphone Review and Sound Test

The name of this mic on Amazon is: Professional Studio Recording Condenser Microphone Compatible Phone, Computer, Laptop ,PC, Oenbopo Anchor Microphone with Mount Anti-wind Cap, for Youtube, Podcasting, Twitch, Broadcast,Interview,

lol! Catchy right? Well the brand name on the mic itself is “Soonhua”

I really was impressed with the sound quality for mobile, you seem to need phantom power for computer though. Soon I’m going to take it to my studio to try to record some drums with it.

The Ibanez GiO GRX20 is the best and most versatile electric guitar for under $200

I’ve been playing guitar since I was 10 years old, and I’ve played and owned many guitars in my life. I currently play guitar in a surf rock band where I am playing a lot of leads and using a tremolo on a regular basis. I am also a home recording artist and commercial music producer who records a lot of different styles and sounds. So it may come as a surprise to you that I am using a $149 Ibanez GRX20 as my main, or really ONLY guitar.

I picked one of these up because the price was right and I wanted something with two pickups and a tremolo. After receiving it, it quickly became my go-to axe for everything. The dual humbucker pickup and 3 way switch / tone volume controls make it very versatile. Giving you options for hard rock crunch, mellow jazzy warm tones, screaming metal lead, and even 60s reverb saturated surf sounds!

The feel is excellent and has a very nice build quality far above it’s price range. I absolutely love the neck and I honestly believe this guitar has made me a better guitarist because it seems to fit my playing style so well. I’ve wailed on the tremolo for hours at a time, barely having to retune and the look of it is downright sexy. I’m considering picking up a second one just because I love it so much.

If you’re on the market for a great guitar and you don’t want to break the bank, I highly recommend the Ibanez GRX20ZJB!

The new Simmons SD2000 is the first electronic drum kit I’ve ever actually wanted!

Despite not even being out yet, the YouTube video being overrun by angry trolls, this drum kit is the first electronic set I’ve actually wanted. Simmons came back into the e-drum market a decade or so ago and has mostly been focused on lower end kits until now.

A few things immediately caught my eye about this kit, the classic hexagon shaped pads, the mesh hitting surface, the classic Simmons sound banks, and lastly but most importantly, the ability to sample and import your own sounds into the kit!

I really want one of these things!