Category Archives: drums

Ghost Image (Haunted Halloween Special!)

Over the past few months I noticed things being moved around at night when I wasn’t at the studio. I set up some security cameras and what I captured is pretty shocking!

I created all of the music and video in Ubuntu Linux 16.04LTS. The music sequence was composed in LMMS then exported stems to Mixbus 3.6 where I mixed it and recorded the drums. I mastered the track in Audacity and edited the video in Kdenlive.

Drum setup:
2015 Tama Imperialstar Bob Kit Hairline Blue finish
Gibraltar floating tom mount system
Tama Iron Cobra hi hat stand (main hats)
Vintage Olympic hi hat stand (trash hats)
Ludwig flat base straight stands (crashes)
PDP boom stand (ride)
Vintage Nuvader Nickel Silver 15″ Hi Hats
Meinl HCS 8″ Bell
Kasza 17″ Dirty Bell crash cymbal
Vintage NuVader 22″ ride cymbal (Nickel Silver)
Meinl HCS 16″ Trash Crash / Generic 16″ brass crash bottom (trash hats)
Vintage Camber 18″ Crash Cymbal (Brass)
Aquarian Studio X on tom batters
Tama single ply clear tom resonants
Aquarian Studio X Dot on snare batter
Tama thin clear snare resonant
Aquarian Response 2 Coated kick batter
Remo Vintage Emperor w/ Kickport 2 on kick resonant
DW 6000 kick pedal (sucks, I want a new pedal)
Vintage flat base Slingerland snare stand
Vintage MIJ canister throne

Helicopter Cop (Cyberpunk) (Drum Playthrough)

A high energy track in 7/4. I started this one with no real idea of where it would go, but then it really took on a life of it’s own! Cyberpunk Math Chiptune? I have no idea, but I think it came out pretty nifty.
The entire song and video were produced, recorded and edited in Ubuntu Linux 16.04. I made the main sequences in LMMS, then exported the stems to Mixbus 3.6. I recorded the drums into Mixbus using my Alesis IO4 along with the built-in audio interface on my core2 duo macbook using the jack audio connection kit giving me a total of 6 inputs! Though I only used 5 because my micro mixer has a mono output. So I just put both toms on one channel then panned them in post. I edited the video in Kdenlive.

Drums used:

2015 Tama Imperialstar Bob Kit Hairline Blue finish
Gibraltar floating tom mount system
Tama Iron Cobra hi hat stand (main hats)
Vintage Olympic hi hat stand (trash hats)
Ludwig flat base straight stands (crashes)
PDP boom stand (ride)
Vintage Nuvader Nickel Silver 15″ Hi Hats
Meinl HCS 8″ Bell
Kasza 17″ Dirty Bell crash cymbal
Vintage NuVader 22″ ride cymbal (Nickel Silver)
Meinl HCS 16″ Trash Crash / Generic 16″ brass crash bottom (trash hats)
Vintage Camber 18″ Crash Cymbal (Brass)
Aquarian Studio X on tom batters
Tama single ply clear tom resonants
Aquarian Studio X Dot on snare batter
Tama thin clear snare resonant
Aquarian Response 2 Coated kick batter
Remo Vintage Emperor w/ Kickport 2 on kick resonant
DW 6000 kick pedal
Vintage flat base Slingerland snare stand
Vintage MIJ canister throne

For more stuff like this, click the YouTube link in the header above

 Evans Hydraulic drum heads on concert toms review

Source: Justin Wierbonski | Drummer | Recording Artist: Evans Hydraulic drum heads on concert toms review

I’ve been playing a concert tom drum kit for the past several years (since 2009 or so) It’s a cheap kit originally. A made in Taiwan Pearl knock off with Luan shells that I literally sawed the bottoms of the far too deep rack toms and refinished the whole kit in a rich walnut oil stain. I then had the shells bearing edges re-cut by none other than Bill Detamore of Pork Pie Percussion.

It has been my main kit for several years, it survived being submerged in water, not once, but twice. Once during hurricane Sandy when my rehearsal space was flooded, and another time when I was in a service elevator in Bushwick that malfunctioned and plunged into a watery basement (this is another story entirely)!

Anyway, since I’ve been using concert toms, I’ve tried many different heads on the toms to see which ones I thought worked the best. I’ve used everything from remo black dots, to attack single ply coated, pinstripes, coated emperors and ambassadors, and finally just yesterday, Evans Hydraulics. It now is obvious to me why this particular head was so damn popular in the 1970s. Since the 70s were the age of the concert tom, it makes sense that a head that works so wonderfully on them would be widely used.

I had tried Hydraulics years ago but it was in an inappropriate setting, on regular drums poorly tuned that weren’t mine at a party. My impression of them then was pretty horrible and I just always written them off as being too dead and thick. But concert toms are a totally different animal. When I first started using them, I tried black dots (CS heads) they sounded nice, but after touring in a band again, I didn’t want to spend so much money on heads, so I started using the Attack single ply coated, which sounded nice but wasn’t very durable. I then tried coated pinstripes which sounded absolutely horrible. They were a weird, boingy sounding head that just didn’t work at all on my drums. It’s odd that a pinstripe is another oil filled head similar to a hydraulic, but the sound was drastically different. The Pinstripes actually had more high overtones than the single ply Attack heads, which was pretty crazy.

I wanted to re-head my toms and I was almost going to buy some black dots again, because up until now they were the best I’d tried on this kit. But I thought I’d try something different and remembered reading several places that the Hydraulics were good on concert toms, so I thought I’d give them one more chance. Plus they seemed to be a bit cheaper than black dots and more readily in stock.

It turns out that all the things that make Evans Hydraulics a horrible choice for toms with resonant heads are the exact things that make them great for concert toms. Like, being insanely thick, having a ludicrous amount of oil sandwiched between the two layers, and a complete lack of high overtones, all work amazingly well as soon as you take the bottom head out of the picture.

I first put them on and noticed how quickly they seemed to set and tune, much quicker than any Remo I’ve used. The thick blue oil filled layers gave a nice medium sustain, but much warmer than any other head I’ve put on a concert tom. High dissonant overtones are just gone. The floor tom especially was troublesome with other heads, but with the hydraulic it sounds nearly perfect with a warm sustain, clear note projection, and the sharp attack of a concert tom. There is also a much needed added bass presence to these heads, which is something that can seem lacking in concert toms.

I think the Evans blue hydraulic may be the perfect head for concert tom drums and will be what I use from this point forward on the toms. Its got me a bit curious about trying one on the kick too!

Akai MPD24 Finger Drumming – Trap, Vaporwave, Trip Hop

akai mpd24 finger drumming

I Finally upgraded from the nanoPAD to an Akai MPD24. I really love this thing.

Geeky Gigs #9 is a bit of a hodgepodge mix up of styles, kinda trap, kinda vaporwave, kinda trip hop, and just kinda weird. I cut up son Janet Jackson, 808, casio rapman, my own real drum samples, some vinyl drum samples and some synth parts and bass lines using the UVI digital sensations and Plastique VST. Everything is live sequenced and triggered in Ableton Live Intro.
The end is a bit of improv. Hope you like it!

Subscribe Geeky Gigs #9

Free Finger Drumming Lessons with the master, Jeremy Ellis

If you’re just getting started playing pads, these videos can be of great help. They helped me quite a bit. Even if you already play, there’s some great techniques shown in Jeremy’s vids. If you’ve never seen Jeremy Ellis play pads, it is truly a sight to behold. He is seriously one of my favorite “drummers” right now.

akai-mpd24-51234

If you’re looking to buy a pad controller, I recommend the Akai MPD26 below. They’re very affordable and very well made. I have the 24 which is very similar but no longer being produced.