Category Archives: MIDI

Introducing The Macintosh SE/30 Raspberry Pi

This is a project I’ve wanted to do for a long time, and I finally did it and decided to make a youtube vid about it. I took an old Mac SE30 case and built an all in 1 Raspberry Pi DAW computer into it. I really think it came out fantastically well and wanted to share my tips in making one for your self. Thanks for watching and please watch more of my videos!

Here’s all the links to buy everything talked about in the vid:

raspberry pi 3 kit https://amzn.to/2KpQhiN

behringer uca202 https://amzn.to/2HHo0CL

screen https://amzn.to/2HI7Sko

industrial velcro https://amzn.to/2JDX734

dremel tool https://amzn.to/2HGNZKC

sabrenet usb hub https://amzn.to/2KoTAqI

keyboard https://amzn.to/2HGKfg3

mouse https://amzn.to/2Ksrgno

headphone cable https://amzn.to/2JHw1YV

usb cable https://amzn.to/2I1S3s3

Yamaha FB-01 FM Synth Module with Live Drums

This is a new song I created with only the Yamaha FB-01 in 8 part multi-timbral mode and then played lived drums to it. No FX were used on the FB-01. I seqenced the MIDI using the program, Seq24 for linux, then recorded the drums in Harrison Mixbus 4.
Drums used were a 1966 Slingerland Blue Sparkle kit, with an 80s metal Pearl Export 6.5×14 snare drum. Mics used in this recording were:
Kick – CAD KBM412 http://amzn.to/2yzAGan
Snare – PDMIC78 http://amzn.to/2AFBBYf
Overheads – http://amzn.to/2iUjPZ1

How To Transfer SysEx Data From Computer To Synth For Free Using MidiOX

Sysex stands for “system exclusive”, and it is the format that was used by many synths to store the information of the synthesizer. You can store patches, settings and banks using sysex data. If you’ve ever wondered how to transfer sysex patches to your vintage synth using a modern computer, there’s plenty of commercial programs out there that can do this with, but you can also do it for free with a program called MidiOX.

In this older YouTube video of mine, I go over the process of doing this with my vintage K1 synth. The same technique can be used with nearly any synth that works with sysex data. All you need is a windows or linux computer, and a midi interface like this one or something similar and you can create your own library of patches on your computer for your vintage midi synths.

What is great about this is you can download thousands of patches online and easily transfer them to your synth achieving maximum fun.

5 Ways to use MIDI Pad Controllers in Linux

Pad controllers are a lot of fun to play and use for making music. They’re great for live performance, or for composing drums at home and not disturbing the neighbors or taking up space. I have one just like the one pictured above (MPD24) that I used to make many performance videos on YouTube.

If you’re on Windows or Mac, a lot of people just use Ableton Live for pad controllers. But what if you’re using Linux? What kind of options do you have for fingerdrumming? I thought I’d put together a list of a few programs I know work well with Pad Controllers.

  1. Creating your own soundfonts with Swami.

Swami is great for pad controllers because you can create very complex sample sets then save them to .sf2 files. Then you just open them up with qsynth/fluidsynth and you have an awesome standalone sample player that is fully customizable with your particular pad controller.

2. LinuxSampler

Linuxsampler is a very powerful software sample player that can load many sampler formats like sfz, GigaStudo, and sf2. It’s a bit of a pain to setup and use though.

3. AVLDrumkits

If you’re wanting to just play drums on your controller, AVLDrumKits is an LV2 plugin that has some good drumsounds. You can program your controller to a comfortable layout to play the kit.

4. Drumgizmo

Drumgizmo is another great drum sampler for Linux. There’s some very high quality drum kits available for it, and you can create your own using it’s special editor called DGEdit.

5. Drumkv1

Drumkv1 is probably my favorite option for pad controllers on Linux right now. All you need to do is drag and drop any sample into whatever slot you want to have on your controller. This makes it easy for mapping, as well as easily apply fx, filters, and LFOs to any sample. No external editor needed! Then you can save your kits and use them any time!

If you’re looking for a place to get a ton of samples, loops, and one hits, check out this page!