How To Get Your Music Heard On YouTube

YouTube is one of the most popular websites in the world. In fact, YouTube Search the second most popular search engine on earth behind Google itself. If you’re a musician, getting exposure of your music these days can be very hard. There’s Scrillions of musicians and producers out there, and all of them posting music out there for free. So how do you get people to hear yours?

Well I stumbled across this concept actually years ago with one of my first YouTube videos. I had a Casio CZ-3000 Synthesizer and really loved the sound of it, so I thought I’d make a full album with only that synth. I made a little (horribly produced) demo video for the album and posted it to YouTube. I was shocked to see how popular it was becoming.

The video today is approaching 30,000 views. This is quite a lot for an obscure, and unknown Ambient artist. Then I figured it out. Its the gear.

What do people go on YouTube to search for? They’re not going to search for some unknown artist name they’ve never heard of, but they WILL search for certain pieces of equipment because they want to know how they sound or are just a fan of the instrument itself.

Here’s another one I did of a piece of music based on the Korg NANOPad:

This one is approaching the 4,000 mark.

When a musician wants to buy something, a lot of times they want to see it in action before they spend their hard earned cash on something. Sure some people just make boring demos where they simply play the sounds of the gear and do nothing else, but why do this when you could fully express your creative vision?

You could really exploit this concept and find gear that is trending at the moment and produce content using that gear. The more people are searching for that piece of gear, the more they’ll hear your music. You can then post links to download and purchase your music in the video.

Yamaha FB-01 FM Synth Module with Live Drums

This is a new song I created with only the Yamaha FB-01 in 8 part multi-timbral mode and then played lived drums to it. No FX were used on the FB-01. I seqenced the MIDI using the program, Seq24 for linux, then recorded the drums in Harrison Mixbus 4.
Drums used were a 1966 Slingerland Blue Sparkle kit, with an 80s metal Pearl Export 6.5×14 snare drum. Mics used in this recording were:
Kick – CAD KBM412 http://amzn.to/2yzAGan
Snare – PDMIC78 http://amzn.to/2AFBBYf
Overheads – http://amzn.to/2iUjPZ1

Stranger Waves – A Synthwave Compilation Inspired By Stranger Things

Stranger Things is still crushing the internet with Season 2, and in addition to being a great show, it’s inspiring all kinds of amazing music from all over the world. The online group “Synthwave Emotions”  has released this amazing compilation of music inspired by the show.

Artists featured on the compilation are:

01. 26Hate – Stranger Waves (Opening Theme) 00:00
02. Immortal Girlfriend – Overcome The Night 01:16
03. 26Hate – Devotion 04:41
04. Midnight Danger – Malignant Force 09:07
05. Pontiac At night – Curfew Violations 13:37
06. ÆX44 – Demogorgon 18:07
07. Deathray Bam! – Behind the Wall 24:41
08. Turbo Knight – Strange Aeons 29:17
09. Master System – Distance (feat. Ultraboss) 34:14
10. Leg Puppy – Utopia (Eternity 84) 39:32
11. Le Louvre – Blood Moon 43:39
12. Zane Alexander – Quarantine 48:55
13. Venator – Sanguine 52:31
14. Saffari – Strange Kind of Feeling 58:02
15. Cleeve Morris – Dustin 01:01:41
16. Once Around Saturn – Titan Excursion 01:04:38
17. DREAM SHORE – Upon A Story 01:07:09
18. Steve Arrows – VHS Ghost 01:10:46
19. Shadows & Mirrors – Nightmareland 01:13:41
20. White Tiger – Explorers (ft. JJ Mist) 01:16:09
21. Dead Bad Bunny – The Upside Down Theme 01:22:10
22. Midnight Danger – Darkness Approaches (Bonus) 01:23:53
23. Turbo Knight – Mirrorverse (Bonus) 01:27:53
24. ÆX44 – The other side (Bonus) 01:32:23
25. Fishdick – Falcons Crest (Bonus) 01:35:52

This is great and fun stuff, well produced and making for a great Friday morning.

Best Gift For Your Synth Player Friend 2017

Synthesizers can be pretty expensive, but the company Korg has been doing a great job of making inexpensive synths with amazing features like the “Volca” line. These are small footprint analog synthesizers that have all kinds of nifty features like sequencers, ring modulators, and delays.

The Volca synth I’m focusing on this article is the Volca Keys.

The Volca Keys is not new, having first come out in 2013, but is just as cool today as it was when it was first introduced. No other company besides Korg has been able to come up with a competitively priced synthesizer with the amazing features the Volca Keys has.

Some of it’s most impressive features are:

  1. MIDI input – this was the big problem with Korg’s “Monotron” series. Cool as they are, there’s no way to control them with an external device. This is not the case with the Volca Series.  
  2. Three voice polyphony – of course this isn’t amazing compared to digital synths, but as far as analog goes, it’s better than being Monophonic, which is what most other analog synths are that are under $700 by other manufacturers.
  3. Built-in sequencer, ring modulator, and delay with automation – Not only is there a sequencer, but all of the built-in fx can be automated within the sequencer. This is very cool and opens up all kinds of possibilities.
  4. It’s under $200!

This holiday season, you can make your electronic musician smile with the Korg Volca Keys 🙂

How To Transfer SysEx Data From Computer To Synth For Free Using MidiOX

Sysex stands for “system exclusive”, and it is the format that was used by many synths to store the information of the synthesizer. You can store patches, settings and banks using sysex data. If you’ve ever wondered how to transfer sysex patches to your vintage synth using a modern computer, there’s plenty of commercial programs out there that can do this with, but you can also do it for free with a program called MidiOX.

In this older YouTube video of mine, I go over the process of doing this with my vintage K1 synth. The same technique can be used with nearly any synth that works with sysex data. All you need is a windows or linux computer, and a midi interface like this one or something similar and you can create your own library of patches on your computer for your vintage midi synths.

What is great about this is you can download thousands of patches online and easily transfer them to your synth achieving maximum fun.