Tag Archives: drumming

Playing drums releases frustration, anger, anxiety, and will basically just fix you

 

I started playing the drums when I was 10 years old. It was mostly my father’s idea, because I used to bang on things a lot, so he got me a drum set since it was a way I could put my banging to good use. I certainly did. Here I am 34 years later, still playing the drums. Drums let me tour the country playing in bands as a teen and young adult, it allowed me to perform in theatre, and professional shows as an adult, and now making my own music and running a YouTube channel.

All of that stuff is awesome, and I am so thankful I got to experience so much playing the drums. But even without all of that, the most important part of playing the drums, is it is a way to escape all my troubles and release all of my pent up aggression, anger, and frustrations. It also seems to just make anxiety fade away. Drumming is one of the best things to turn negative energy into something positive. It is the one instrument that can take literal RAGE and make it sound amazing.

Music in general is a great form of escape, whether playing it or listening to it, but playing drums especially is something magical. It’s highly physical, it’s loud, and the longer you do it, the more benefit you get. If you want to rid yourself of anxiety, sit down at the drums and learn something new. Focusing on rhythms you do not already know, will make your brain switch from worry mode, to concentration mode. The loudness and power of the instrument make it impossible to ignore. Play until you can do it right without thinking. If that happens too fast and you’re still feeling anxiety, pick something harder. Do it until you’re exhausted. You’ll find the anxiety has just vanished.

To drum away anger or frustration, start off going crazy on the drums. Let it all out, bang on everything like crazy. Do as much spastic drum soloing, or just chaotic noise as possible for about 25 to 30 minutes. But at the end of this, turn it into a groove. Play something simple, or something you can really latch onto. Stay steady, don’t speed up, don’t slow down. Evolve the chaos into something with order. This will place things in order in your mind and spirit. Play the steady groove for the equal time as the chaos. At the end of this session, if you’re still feeling anger or frustration, repeat the process. It will fade.

Drums will fix you. Don’t worry about them. Fix you. They need to figure out themselves.

Damon Che Documentary | The Godfather Of Mathrock Drums

I started playing the drums when I was 10 years old. Over the years many different drummers have influenced my playing but one in particular that I saw play in the early 90s basically changed the way I thought about playing the drums, and the instrument as a whole. That drummer was Damon Che of the band Don Caballero. 

I grew up in Morgantown WV, and quite often my friends and I would head up to nearby Pittsburg PA to see touring bands that weren’t making it to Morgantown. This time we were heading up to see the band Tar. Tar were an awesome band and we were all very excited to see them. There were two opening bands, and one of them was this band I’d never heard of at the time called Don Caballero.  

I barely remember them setting up, but I do remember some tall lanky dude standing outside behind the glass doors of the venue before they got started in a long black trench coat, drinking water out of a gallon jug and smoking a cigarette. That dude was the drummer of Don Cab, Damon Che.  

Don Cab came out and their first song was like a sudden explosion of a sonic fireball that basically leveled the audience. You could feel everyone in the room staring at the stage like they were witnessing something like planets colliding. At the center of all this, and the one directing the collision was the drummer. He was seated behind a cheap black Pearl Export series drum set, with huge toms setup nearly perfectly flat and gigantic shiny B8 Pro cymbals set up very high and tilted. 

I was close to the front of the stage, and watching him play, but couldn’t really believe my eyes. His motions were completely alien looking, and the way his drums were setup looked amazingly uncomfortable. But the sounds I was hearing were unlike any drumming I had previously encountered. It was busy, really busy, but with a very deep pocket feel and incredible power. Every couple seconds I was hearing a new beat I hadn’t heard anyone else play before. It was complex, bombastic, intense and incredibly tight.  

At this moment I knew the drumming world had just received an upgrade and I felt incredibly inspired to get even better at drums and my love for the instrument grew even stronger than it already was.  

So let’s take a closer look at Damon Che and see what exactly made him such an awesome force behind the drums.