Tag Archives: linux photography

RAW Photography and Linux

Funny Fish Heads

As an audio guy, I always heard people talking about RAW photography format, but I didn’t really know much about it. An old co-worker of mine would constantly tell me it was better, but he really couldn’t express it in a meaningful way that made sense to me, so honestly I never really thought much of it.

Recently though I installed a hack on my Canon Powershot that enabled me to shoot in RAW and I wanted to learn more about it. I started reading online and playing with software in Linux and one program quickly came up as what seemed like a great one for RAW photography processing…. Darktable.

So first off, what is RAW? To explain this simply and from an audio engineer’s point of view, imagine your camera lens was a microphone. Now imagine that your camera body is an fx chain that processes what goes into the microphone then converts it to an MP3 before it writes it to memory. Would you want to record sound this way? I wouldn’t. But this is exactly how most cameras record images. You take a picture, the camera lens captures the image and the camera takes color information, exposure compensation, sharpening data, or whatever else gets determined at the time, applies that to the image data, then compresses all of that into a .jpg file which has all of this data permanently stored in the file and unchangeable except for post-processing.

90% of the time, this is just fine for most people. Because the camera was intelligently designed to figure out most of the important work to optimize the image to make it look it’s best according to the settings used at the time the image was captured. But for a serious photographer, or just for anyone who likes having insane amounts of control over all of their creative work, RAW is a much better option. When you shoot in RAW your lens captures the image data, and the camera still captures the processing data, but instead of writing it together into a .jpg file, the image data is stored purely without any processing or compression applied to it and the processing information is stored in a header of the RAW data.

Now back to Darktable.

Darktable is a photo management program for processing RAW images. When you open a RAW file in Darktable, many times you’ll already see a processing history on the image in the left pane of the software. This is because Darktable reads the header information from the RAW file that your camera wrote and applies it to the image data. The major difference here is you can turn it off and see what it looks like without any of that applied. You can decide to use it or not, and you can tweak, add to it, change it, or just discard it all together if you like.

There are many other tools for Linux for working with RAW images. Digikam has RAW processing features, though in my opinion Darktable seems to work much better and is faster. Gimp also has the ability to work with RAW, but not out of the box. You need to install the UFRaw plugin, but once you do, then you have access to a lot of processing tools for RAW images that are quite good. The major difference between this approach instead of using Darktable, is all of the RAW processing is done in the importing process of Gimp. This may be good or bad depending on your needs. Gimp has a more robust set of editing features more similar to Photoshop, where Darktable has a lot of RAW processing features with endless undos and a very nice photo management system.

My conclusion and personal workflow at least at this moment is Darktable as my organizer and main RAW processor, and Gimp for special and more in-depth editing. You could look at it like: Gimp=Photoshop and Darktable=Lightroom.

I hope you found this article helpful and please ask questions if you have any. I will be making some video tutorials on these subjects in the near future as well.

Linux for Serious Photography

This post comes from Scribbles and Snaps blog, so be sure to check out the original post here! 

Linux Tools For Serious Photographers

While most mainstream Linux distros come with photo management software, these applications are more suited for shutterbugs than serious amateurs and professional photographers. Fortunately, there are quite a few high-quality powerful Linux-based photographic tools that can rival proprietary commercial applications like Adobe Photoshop Elements and Lightroom. And using applications like Entangle, Rapid Photo Downloader, and digiKam, you can turn your Linux machine into a powerful darkroom for processing and organizing photos.

Common Photographic Tasks

Let’s start with a brief overview of common photographic tasks:

  • While you’d normally use your camera to take photos, there are a couple of Linux-based tools that can be used to remotely control and trigger your camera. These tools can come in handy for exposure bracketing, focus stacking, macro photography, and so on.
  • Before you can do anything with your photos, you need to transfer them from your camera to a computer, and then import them into the photo management application.
  • Next, you have to sort and organize the imported photos.
  • Once the photos have been neatly organized, you have to process the RAW files.
  • Most of us share our photographic masterpieces with others. And in most cases, we publish photos using either one of many third-party photo sharing services, or upload photos to self-hosted galleries.

So what are the tools that can help you to handle these photographic tasks on Linux?

digiKam to Rule Them All

A solid photographic workflow is unthinkable without an application that can help you to import, process, and organize photos. While there are several such applications available on Linux (RawstudioDarktableRawTherapee, etc.), digiKam makes a sensible choice for a number of reasons.

  • Thanks to the LibRaw decoding and processing library, digiKam can handle a wide range of RAW formats. digiKam currently supports more than 400 cameras that shoot in RAW, and new models are added almost as soon as they hit the market.
  • digiKam offers several ways to view your photos. You can use a conventional album view, browse photos by tags or by date, or display your photos as a timeline. digiKam also allows you to view your photos on the map, provided they have been properly geotagged.
  • Speaking of geotagging, the application sports a separate interface for working with geographical data. You can use it not only to geotag photos, but also geocorrelate them. digiKam offers another useful feature called reverse geocoding. Using it, you can retrieve human-readable locations such as city, street, country, etc. for photos based on their geographical coordinates.
  • The photo management application offers a wide array of tools that can help you to keep tabs on your photos. For example, digiKam offers tagging and rating features. In addition to that, the application sports the Color labels and Picks tools. The former lets you apply color codes to photos, while the latter can come in handy for quickly sorting photos.
  • digiKam sports powerful filtering and search capabilities. The dedicated Filters sidebar in digiKam offers a simple yet flexible way to filter photos by specific criteria. For example, you can easily set up a filter that displays photos containing certain tags and have a specific color label.
  • The application supports non-destructive editing and versioning. This allows you to tweak photos without affecting their originals. In addition to that, you can save multiple modified versions of the same original and use digiKam to neatly organize them as well as keep track of changes made to each version.
  • When it comes to editing, digiKam offers a wide selection of useful tools. Besides the usual suspects like Curve and Level adjustment tools, digiKam offers exposure blending, lens correction, perspective adjustment, black-and-white conversion, and many other nifty features. Better yet, the application sports powerful batch processing capabilities which allow you to apply multiple editing and conversion operations on a set of photos.
  • Finally, thanks to a comprehensive collection of bundled plugins, you can publish your photos on many popular photo sharing services like Flickr, Picasa, Facebook, SmugMug, and others.

Read More here!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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